Research

And Learning

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RED NOSES International

©RED NOSES International

Learning how to Learn

 

ClowNexus aims to improve the capacity of healthcare clowning organisations in Europe to learn more about their work and creatively share those discoveries. The learning processes developed in ClowNexus should enable healthcare clowns and other creative professionals to grow and transform how they work, as well as provide evidence of their impact on individuals and society.

Our research and learning initiatives include

  • Development of a Learning Toolkit for the healthcare clowning sector
  • Conversation Platform for artists and creative professionals to share knowledge and document their transformation
  • Evaluations at the beginning and end of the project to measure progress against a baseline

Baseline Study

 

In the beginning of the project, we conducted a baseline evaluation to get a situational analysis at the start of the activities. The evaluation also established baseline indicator values, which will enable future assessments of the project activities as well as the achievements.

It serves as a snapshot in time to better understand how project partners and stakeholders perceive key topics of interest, such as how clowning meets the needs of the project target groups and the general level of awareness of healthcare clowning in society.

The evaluation was oriented around a set of learning questions, which were developed in consultation with the partner consortium. These learning questions will guide further reflection and growth throughout the project. 

 

ROTE NASEN

©RED NOSES International

ROTE NASEN

©RED NOSES International

Baseline Study

 

In the beginning of the project, we conducted a baseline evaluation to get a situational analysis at the start of the activities. The evaluation also established baseline indicator values, which will enable future assessments of the project activities as well as the achievements.

It serves as a snapshot in time to better understand how project partners and stakeholders perceive key topics of interest, such as how clowning meets the needs of the project target groups and the general level of awareness of healthcare clowning in society.

The evaluation was oriented around a set of learning questions, which were developed in consultation with the partner consortium. These learning questions will guide further reflection and growth throughout the project. 

 

Learning questions

of ClowNexus

Question 1:

The Target Groups

What do we know about the lives and worlds of older people with dementia & children with autism?

Elderly with dementia and children with autism have unique perspectives of the world, which are often not valued. They are not uniform groups and represent a wide spectrum.

Question 2:

Artistic Techniques

What artistic clowning techniques work best with the target groups?

Individualized attention, a slow pace, and an exploration of the senses are all key. Clowns have to put aside their expectations and be comfortable without receiving a reaction.

Question 3:

The Co-Creation Process

What makes co-creation successful?

The project stakeholders see a strong opportunity for more participatory co-design, especially with participants, family members, social experts and specialists. There is eagerness to learn more about creating art together with the target groups. Another wish is to collaborate more internationally and with artists from other disciplines.

Question 4:

Impact of Clowning

What is the effect of clowning on target groups, their care providers, their families, and their broader environment?

Changes for the target groups, including care providers, have been observed on mood, stress levels, attention/focus, physical behaviour, and connections/relationships.

Question 5:

Learning about Clowning

What are the best ways to monitor, evaluate, and learn from healthcare clowning?

Creative tools can reflect the creative nature of clowning and are better suited to capture the depth and diversity of clowning beyond quantitative indicators.

Question 6:

Advocacy

How can we advance humour and the arts more broadly for vulnerable groups?

Clowns in hospitals are well-known and broadly accepted, but there is limited awareness about clowning for other target groups, and only a narrow understanding of the benefits of clowning.

Clownexus SOME SCIENTIFIC PROOF ABOUT THE IMPACT OF ART ON MENTAL WELLBEING 1

Some Scientific proof about the impact of art on mental wellbeing

Clownexus SOME SCIENTIFIC PROOF ABOUT THE IMPACT OF ART ON MENTAL WELLBEING 1

Creative Health:
The Arts for Health and Wellbeing (2017)

by All-Party Parliamentary Group on Arts, Health and Wellbeing (UK)

The Inquiry Report presents the findings of two years of research, evidence-gathering and discussions with patients, health and social care professionals, artists and arts administrators, academics, people in local government, ministers, other policy-makers and parliamentarians from both Houses of Parliament.

Download here

Benefits of medical clowning in the treatment of young children with autism spectrum disorder (2019)

by Shahar Shefer, Odelia Leon Attia, Ruth Rosenan, Ori A. Wald, Hamutal Ende & Lidia V. Gabis

The Report investigated the contribution of group therapy delivered by a medical clown to young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Download here

Elder-Clowning in Long-Term Dementia Care:

Results of a Pilot Study (2016)

by P. Kontos, K.-L. Miller, R. Colobong, L. Palma Lazgare, M. Binns, L.-F. Low,  C. Surr, G. Naglie

To assess the effects of elder-clowning on moderate to severe behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in nursing home residents with dementia, primarily of the Alzheimer’s type.

Download here

 

 

World Health Organization

What is the evidence on the role of the arts in improving health and well-being? A scoping review (2019)

by Daisy Fancourt, Saoirse Finn

Over the past two decades, there has been a major increase in research into the effects of the arts on health and well-being, alongside developments in practice and policy activities in different countries across the WHO European Region and further afield. This report synthesizes the global evidence on the role of the arts in improving health and well-being, with a specific focus on the WHO European Region.

Download here

Download the Fact sheet

Intersectoral action: the arts, health and well-being

Health 2020: a framework for action and strengthening the links between health and arts.

The goal of Health 2020 is to significantly improve the health and well-being of populations, reduce health inequalities, strengthen public health and ensure people-centred health systems that are universal, equitable, sustainable and of high quality.

Download here

 

 

 

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